History in

Onehouse, Harleston and Shelland

Welcome.

The Parish magazine is called OHSMag so perhaps this should be OHS-Hist.  On these webpages we can share information about the OHS Local History Group, AND the history of Onehouse, Harleston and Shelland.

Either read on or click on one of these.

OHS Local History Group
Onehouse
Harleston
Shelland

 

 

 

 

 

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OHS Local History Group

We meet in the Trinity Hall (formerly Church Room), Forest Rd, Onehouse , IP14 3HJ

on the first Tuesday of every month at 7.30, unless advised otherwise. (** below warns that this will be the second Tuesday)

Annual Subs £10, meetings cost £3  for members and visitors £4.

For more information please contact Jill Raisey 01449 613132

 

Coming Up in 2020

 

 

January                           No Meeting

February 4th                 When Buffalo Bill came to East Anglia                                 Speaker  Geoff Robinson

March 3rd                      The History of West Suffolk Hospital                                    Speaker  Terry O’Donaghue

April 7th                         Beyond Hatches, Matches & Dispatches                              Speaker  Sara Doig

May 5th                          Visit to Sudbury Heritage Centre                                          6.30pm

June 2nd                        Visit – TBA

July 7th                           Orchard Barn                                                                            6.30pm

August                             No Meeting

September 3rd               Shepherd & Dog Meal                                                             7.00 for 7.30

October 6th                    You’ll make a lovely Sergeant                                                Speaker Janette Robinson

November 3rd                Minstrels and Mayhem                                                           Speaker – Kate Jewell

December 8th**            AGM and Christmas Party

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Onehouse … In The Beginning

Well we all have to start somewhere so …

Start with the place name of Onehouse. The earliest mention so far is 1086 in the Domesday Survey and it is spelt as Anhus.    It is a Saxon word and means a single or lonely House. The “house” is sometimes translated as a hall. Later it is spelt as Onhus, which is getting dangerously close to our local pronunciation of “Wunnus”

Look at the following map (click on the highlighted text) of listed buildings for Onehouse,

Sketchmap of listed buildings in Onehouse

How many of these old buildings can you name?   What we can see today of these  listed buildings  are timbers dating from the 1600s, but it would be a safe bet that these buildings were made on top of, or adjacent to, older dwellings.

Domesday 1086 …36 households

Somehow there were 36 households here at the time of the Domesday (Just Click Here for a look) Survey in 1086 in 5 separate manors. We might see these as more like  farm estates.  Use the Map of the listed buildings to help you guess where you would think that these estates were?  That would give us a population estimate between 38 and   144.

 

Poll Tax 1381 ….18 households?

The next time that we got a glimpse of the whole population was in the dreaded Poll Tax returns that contributed to the Peasants Revolt in 1381. If you want more information about this then look HERE.

Shelland, Harleston and Onehouse are combined as a separate entry.

But in “Onehowse” the record now shows 24 individuals recorded in 18 households. Here is the list that is still legible. It is interesting to note those names still in use today. A knight of the realm would be 6/- (six old shillings) and the poorest serf would be 4d (4 old pence). The question marks are where the original document is so damaged that it is not possible to see any marks, but we can use this data to give us ideas about names in use at that time..

 

Roger & Alice Corper 2/4d
John & Margaret Hevy 2/4d
Lucia H???nt   8d
Henry and Matilda ? 2/4d
Agnes Al ?   8d
Robert & Cristina Hell….. 2/-
John & Alicia ? 2/-
John & Joanna ? 12d
? ? 12d
? ? 20d
? ? 12d
? ? 12d
? ? 12d
? Letyl 12d
? Letyl 12d
? ? 16d
? ? 12d
? Bryd  8d

 

 

 

 

There appears to be an absence of very poor and very rich. At present we have no record of the Corper family being in any other way associated with Onehouse.

Ship Money Returns for 1639-40 ….13 Households

We now have a jump in the records to Charles I who wanted to raise money for a full time navy. Without any reference to Parliament he brought in the “Ship Money”. The method of calculation is not precise and it seems to be related to how much land you own or derive an income from and your ability to pay.  This was not a highly popular tax. It is another snapshot of who is living where.

£ s d
John Thompson 3 10 0
Clerk Steedman 8 10
Edward Pilburrough 6 0
Widow Syre 7 0
John Robson 7 0
Rich Sparrow 6 0
John Bradley 6 0
Rich Darcie 4 0
Rich Pilburrough 4 0
John Syre 4 0
Simon Johnson for the home sitting 1 0
Robert Burland 2 6
Thomas Carver 1 0
Outsitters
Sir Roger North 4 0
Phillip Parsons Clerk 2 0
Richard Syre 6 0
Thomas Vincent 3 6
Noel Oliver 3 6
William Wage 3 0
Thomas Pilburrough 2 0
Thomas Miller 1 6
Robert Hubbart for Johnsons ploughlands 1 0
Widow Dowle 9
Ricard Darcie 9

At present it is not clear who John Thompson was but he was clearly wealthy. The “Outsitters” were those who owned/ made money on land in the parish but did not live there. Any owner who did not own a house was not included in this tax list.

Hearth Tax 1674   …16 households

The next time we get a glimpse of the population of Onehouse is in the the Hearth Tax returns of 1674. Charles II introduced a tax on each hearth in the house. Each house was inspected.  Each chimney usually carried two flues and each flue ended in a hearth. A third hearth indicates a separate flue, possibly  an additional chimney for a kitchen or bake house.

Dwelling Hearths Head of Household
      1      3 Jo Reynolds
      1 Fr Sparrow
      2      3 Richard Crosse
      2 Jo Wright
      3      3 William Desborough
      4      6 Mr Tompson
      5      2 Henry Self
      6      6 Joseph Cutlove, parson
      7      3 Edward Emerson
      8      3 Widow Godwin
      9      2 Goody Lockwood
    10      2 Widow Steadman
    11 Noe Distress Fr Bird
    12 Robert Larvis
    13 Ro Burnham
    14 Jo Walker
    15 Dan. Walker
   16 Jo Johnson

In the returns we see 2 of the dwellings with 6 hearths, suggesting three or more chimneys, one of those was the “parson”  and the other might be the next sizeable building, probably  Onehouse Hall.  We know that John Pettiward  then owned the hall, so  Mr Tompson must have been his tenant.

Those in the “noe distress” category were recognised  by the local officials then as being unable to pay the tax.  Probably they were eligible for some form of poor relief, but whether they got any is another currently unanswered question.

 

1855 White’s Directory

ONEHOUSE, 2 miles W. by N. of Stowmarket, is a small parish of scattered houses, containing 865a. 1r. 17p. of well-wooded land, and 432 inhabitants, including 225 in Stow Union Workhouse, which is situated here, and is already described at page 407. In the reign of Edward III., it was the seat and estate of Bartholomew de Burghersh, who was one of the twelve barons to whose care the Prince of Wales was committed at the battle of Cressy. He died here in 1300, without male issue, and his sole daughter and heiress married Edward,
Baron Dispenser. On the site of the old hall, encompassed by a moat, a commodious farm house was built many years ago. The grandeur and solitary situation of the ancient mansion probably gave name to the parish, which, little more than two centuries ago, was covered with wood, except a narrow strip, which ascended from, the valley to the hall. Queen Elizabeth, in one of her ” progresses” through this county, breakfasted at Onehouse. The parish still abounds in fine timber trees, and on the glebe adjoining the secluded Rectory House is a wood of ten or twelve acres. Lady Hotham is lady of the manor, and owner of the greater part of the soil, and the remainder belongs to J. Garnham, Esq., (owner of Onehouse Lodge,) and a few smaller owners. It is mostly freehold.

The Church (St.John,) is a small ancient fabric, with some remains of Saxon architecture. The tower is circular, and the font is of unhewn stone.
The rectory, valued in K.B. at £7. 2s. 6d., and now at i:246, has 84|a. of glebe. Lady Hotham’s Trustees, or rather the Trustees of the late Roger Pettiward, Esq., are the patrons, and the Rev. T. M.
Pyke, M.A., is the incumbent.

Post from Stowmarket.

Ablitt Edward & Mrs Eliza, master and matron of Stow Union Workhouse
Ablitt Edmund, schoolmaster, ditto
Martin John, corn miller
Pollard Elizabeth, schoolmistress
Pyke Rev Ts. Massingberd, M A. rector
Riley Jas. brewer, maltster, and vict.Shepherd and Dog
Sparrow Francis, builder
FARMERS.
Crosse Wm., Esq., Onehouse Hall
Green Jacob, Star House, (and Stowmarket)
Matthew James, Chilton House
Phillips Uriah || Riley James
Wilson John, Onehouse Lodge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Harleston … In The Beginning

Well we all have to start somewhere so …

Start with the place name of Harleston. The earliest mention so far is 1086 in the Domesday Survey and it is spelt as Heroluestuna.    It is a Saxon word and means Herowulf or Herewulf’s estate or farmstead. Herowulf or Herewulf is a person’s name.

Look at the following map (click on the highlighted text) of listed buildings for Harleston. It shows you where people were living.

Sketch map of listed buildings in Harleston

How many of these old buildings can you name?   What we can see today of these  listed buildings  are timbers dating from the 1600s, but it would be a safe bet that these buildings were made on top of, or adjacent to, older dwellings.

Domesday 1086 …28 households

Somehow there were 28 households here at the time of the Domesday (Just Click Here for a look)  survey in 1086.  Perhaps we might be missing a few dwellings on our Sketch map?

Any thoughts where they could be?

Poll Tax 1381 …9 households

The next time that we got a glimpse of the whole population was in the dreaded Poll Tax returns that contributed to the Peasants Revolt in 1381. If you want more information about this then look HERE.

Shelland, Harleston and Onehouse are combined as a separate entry

But in “Harlistone” we appear to have 24 individuals in 9 households recorded. Here is the list that is still legible. It is interesting to note those names still in use today. A knight of the realm would be 6/- (six old shillings) and the poorest serf would be 4d (4 old pence).

John & Matilda de Freton 2/7d
Roger & Margery Shaldry  2/4d
Roger & Margaret Cokeman 2/4d
John Alderyd 8d
John & Agatha Lilye 20d
Robert & Joanna Syre 20d
Robert & Margaret Mere 20d
Johannes & Agnes Sl??? 2/4d
?? & Margeria Trust 20d

There appears to be an absence of very poor and very rich.  The ?? shows where the original document was damaged.

Hearth Tax 1674   …16 households

The next time we get a glimpse of the population of “Harlston” is in the the Hearth Tax returns of 1674. Charles II introduced a tax on each hearth in the house. Each house was inspected.  Each chimney usually carried two flues and each flue ended in a hearth. A third hearth indicates a separate flue, possibly in an additional chimney for a kitchen or bake house.

Dwelling Hearths Head of Household
1 2 Thomas Shawe
1 Thomas Osborne
2 4 An Darkin
2 Thomas Brooke
3 3 Edward Lyst
4 2 Thomas Osborne
5 2 Jo Driver
5 Chr Rowland
6 3 Robert Garnham
7 6 Mr. Crosman
9-16 poor received collection.

 

In the returns we only see just 1 dwelling with 6 hearths , making it look like a likely contender for “Harlston” Hall.

It is interesting to note that 8 dwellings  were recorded as “poor no collection”. These were 8 dwellings where the household were recognised  by the local officials then as being unable to pay the tax.

 

1855 White’s Directory

HARLESTON, three miles N.W. of Stowmarket, is a small parish containing only 90 souls, and 620 acres of land, partly copyhold, and partly in the manors of Haughley and Dagworth, but mostly in the manor of Harleston Hall, which belongs to Lady Hotham, who rebuilt the Hall in the Elizabethan style, some years ago; but it is occupied by a farmer.
Charles Tyrell, Esq., has an estate here. The Church is a discharged rectory, valued in K.B. at £7, and in 1835 at .£175. It has 11a. of glebe in Shelland parish, and is in the gift of the Trustees of the late E. Pettiward, Esq., and incumbency of the Rev. Charles Terry, M.A., of Great Finborough.
The Farmers are,
Jacob Bradley Cooper, Hall;
James Davis, White House;
Spencer Peddar, Moor Farm;
and Robert Moye, Gipping Green.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Shelland … In The Beginning

Well we all have to start somewhere so …

Start with the place name of  Shelland. The earliest mention so far is 1086 in the Domesday Survey and it is spelt as Sellanda.    It is a Saxon word and means newly cultivated land on an edge or a shelf. From this it looks as if Shelland was only recently brought under the plough at the time of Domesday.

Look at the following map (click on the highlighted text) of listed buildings for   Shelland

A Sketch map to show the listed buildings in Shelland

How many of these old buildings can you name?   What we can see today of these  listed buildings  are timbers dating from the 1600s, but it would be a safe bet that these buildings were made on top of, or adjacent to, older dwellings.

Domesday 1086… 4 households

There were 4 households here at the time of the Domesday (Just Click here for a look)  survey in 1086.  The buildings at the bottom of the map appear to be a lost settlement straddling the border with neighbouring villages. Note that Shelland Hall is now in the parish of Rattlesden, someone redrew the boundary here!

With all that in mind it does seem uncanny that Shelland can still show 4 main farming estates.

Poll Tax 1381 … 19 households

The next time that we got a glimpse of the whole population was in the dreaded Poll Tax returns that contributed to the Peasants Revolt in 1381. If you want more information about this then look HERE.

Shelland, Harleston and Onehouse are combined as a separate entry

But in “Shellond” we appear to have 29 individuals and 19 households recorded. Here is the list that is still legible. It is interesting to note those names still in use today. A knight of the realm would be 6/- (six old shillings) and the poorest serf would be 4d (4 old pence)

John Hegsete 20d
John & Alicia Hamond 2/4d
John & Cecilia atte Fen 2/-
Thomas and Margery Tynton 2/6d
John & Margery Mundegome 2/-
John & Anita atte Hell 16d
John Scot 6d
Margery Broun 8d
William Tynton 12d
Marioita Hamond 12d
Robert& Margery Cokeman 2/-
John and Margery de Halle 2/-
Amica de Halle 12d
John & Joanna atte cros 2/4d
William & Margaret Letyl 2/4d
Roger Benet 8d
John & “Amicia” Cobbe 2/-
Matilda Trrist 10d
Margeria B…oun 10d

 

There appears to be an absence of very poor and very rich.

Hearth Tax 1674   …14 households

The next time we get a glimpse of the population of  Shelland is in the the Hearth Tax returns of 1674. Charles II introduced a tax on each hearth in the house. Each house was inspected.  Each chimney usually carried two flues and each flue ended in a hearth. A third hearth indicates a separate flue, possibly in an additional chimney for a kitchen or bake house.

Dwelling Hearths Head of Household
1 2 Jo Johnson
2 11 Mr Reeve
3 2 Edmund Harris
4 1 Jo Johnson
5 5 Jo Pooly
6 3 Jo Mudd
7 3 Widow Marriott
8 5 Widow Allum
9 Cert for 1 Jo Jurden
9 Cert for 2 Henry Carver
10 cert for 1 Mat Motham
10 cert for 1 Jo Wolfe
11 Cert for 4 Widow Pole
11 Widow Button

 

Here in Shelland we now have records for  11 dwellings and 14 households.

 

1855 White’s Directory

SHELLAND, a small secluded village and parish, near one of the sources of the river Gipping, 4 miles W.N.W. of Stowmarket, has 91 inhabitants, and 509 acres of well-wooded land, rising in bold undulations, and belonging to Chas. Tyrell, Esq., except 20a. belonging to J. Garnham, Esq , and about two acres belonging to the glebe of Harleston and Onehouse. C. Tyrell, Esq., is lord of the manor, impropriator of the tithes, (commuted for 4’125 per annum,) and patron of the Church, which is a donative, valued at £40, and enjoyed by the Rev. Wm. Steggall, M.A., of Thurston. Shelland was held by the Bouchier and Devereux families, and was sold in 1591, by that great, but unhappy favourite of Queen Elizabeth, Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex.
Rockylls, now a farm, was held by the Drury family, and afterwards by the Rays.
The poor have a yearly rent charge of 50s , left by Wm. Kent in 1712, out of a house and orchard on Shelland Green.
The principal inhabitants are
Wm. Brett, blacksmith ;
Thomas Sparrow, bricklayer ;
Wm. Clark, farmer;
Eliz. Oxer, New Farm ;
and Wm. Peddar, Rockylls Farm.